FISH EAGLE RIVER

WEEKLY FISHING REPORT

Did the fishing bug bite you yet? Cast out for bites of your own on the Chain of 28 Lakes throughout the summer. For more details on where and how to fish the World’s Largest Chain of Lakes and other inland lakes, read the fishing report below.

Fishing Report

Panfish: There are still perch in the weeds and you can find some moving into the rock piles using a slip bobber tipped with minnows or tossing a 1/8th oz. jig with a small minnow seems to be doing the job. Crappies are in the deeper weeds and around structure. Slip bobber rigs with a hook and minnow or a jig and plastic should do the trick. Bluegills are up in the shallows on the warmer lakes; slip bobber rigs baited with red worms or waxies will catch these. Remember we do have panfish regulations on a few of our lakes in the area.

Bass: Largemouth can be found in the shallow weeds and around docks; and they will be caught using top water and spinnerbaits. Smallies are in and around the rocks and can be caught by using small crankbaits and jerkbaits.

Northern: These fish will be found in and around weeds, so pitching jig and minnows or small spinnerbaits and spoons will get their attention.

Walleye: We are casting 1/8th and 1/4 oz. jigs tipped with live bait. Depending on the depth that you are fishing is when you might need to go heavier with your jig.

Muskies: Bucktails and jerkbaits are working, along with top water. These are your go to baits for a while now.

Information for this week’s fishing report was provided by Colin Crawford from Colin Crawford’s Guide Service.

Eagle River Fishing Contacts:

Colin Crawford – 715-891-2715
email: crawfordfishing@gmail.com

George Langley – 715-479-8804
email: fishing@eaglesportscenter.com

FALL FISHING AND HUNTING IS SECOND TO NONE

While the anticipation of Opening Day lures thousands onto Eagle River area lakes at the beginning of May, every angler knows it’s not until fall when the bites come one after another. Fall in Eagle River is also time for another kind of tradition – hunting.Preparing for a long winter of inactivity, trophy fish like musky, walleye and bass are more than willing to see what bait’s on the end of your line in October and November.

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

The calendar might say that spring officially starts next week in Wisconsin. Talk to any avid fisherman, however, and you’ll be told it’s the first Saturday in May – Opening Day.

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